Accomodating disability employer

INTRODUCTION GENERAL PRINCIPLES REQUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AND JOB APPLICANTS REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION RELATED TO THE BENEFITS AND PRIVILEGES OF EMPLOYMENT TYPES OF REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS RELATED TO JOB PERFORMANCE JOB RESTRUCTURING LEAVE MODIFIED OR PART-TIME SCHEDULE MODIFIED WORKPLACE POLICIES REASSIGNMENT OTHER REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION ISSUES UNDUE HARDSHIP ISSUES BURDENS OF PROOF INSTRUCTIONS FOR INVESTIGATORS APPENDIX: RESOURCES FOR LOCATING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS INDEX This Enforcement Guidance clarifies the rights and responsibilities of employers and individuals with disabilities regarding reasonable accommodation and undue hardship. Title I of the ADA requires an employer to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified individuals with disabilities who are employees or applicants for employment, except when such accommodation would cause an undue hardship. The Guidance also covers different types of reasonable accommodations related to job performance, including job restructuring, leave, modified or part-time schedules, modified workplace policies, and reassignment.

This accommodation is reasonable because it is a common-sense solution to remove a workplace barrier being required to stand when the job can be effectively performed sitting down. Similarly, a reasonable accommodation enables an applicant with a disability to have an equal opportunity to participate in the application process and to be considered for a job. Barnett, the Supreme Court held that it was unreasonable, absent "special circumstances," for an employer to provide a reassignment that conflicts with the terms of a seniority system. Finally, a reasonable accommodation allows an employee with a disability an equal opportunity to enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment that employees without disabilities enjoy. Reasonable accommodation is available to qualified applicants and employees with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations must be provided to qualified employees regardless of whether they work part- time or full-time, or are considered "probationary." Generally, the individual with a disability must inform the employer that an accommodation is needed. For a further discussion of this issue, see Question 31, infra. "[W]ith or without reasonable accommodation" includes, if necessary, reassignment to a vacant position.

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